To paddle or to "pedal"

MJ21

Well-Known Member
#2
Ask yourself this...do you really want to pay $3K+ for a pedal drive? If you can say yes to that, then no one can convince you otherwise. Won't lie, I want a Hobie even though I own a boat. My wife is the one that convince's me otherwise.
 

Beer Snob

Well-Known Member
#3
Well it won't be me! My dream kayak has a pedal drive and I see no sense in spending money, time and trouble working my way through several 'yaks to get to it. The only things holding me back are expense and where to store it.
So if your budget allows, I say GO FOR IT!:yes:
 

JC08

New Member
#4
Agreed, I'm cringing at the thought of 2-3k for a pedal drive, but I've seen quite a few used hobies with mirage...
 

DrErk

Well-Known Member
#5
I just upgraded from a paddle to a pedal drive and the difference is night and day. There are a few things to remember when you consider the cost.

1. Most budget kayaks come with nothing but the boat. No paddle, seat is usually on the hull, etc. When you get a Hobie they include a paddle, high low seat, and the mirage drive, which costs 600 by itself. Subtract those and your paying around 1700 or so for the kayak by itself, which isn't budget, but even the nicer brands that aren't pedal drive cost that.
2. The warranty is top notch on higher end kayaks. The Hobie outback has a 2 year warranty, and I've heard they are very good about honoring that promise.
3. The plastic used in higher end kayaks is very durable. People are still pedaling around the original mirage drive kayaks from ten years ago and I've never read any complaints about then cracking, etc.
4. Hobies and Natives hold their value. You don't ever see pedal driven yaks for sale on Craigslist for under 1500 or 2000 and if you do, they have been ridden hard and put away wet for many years or they are stolen.

In the end, your best bet is to try both out. Austin kayak will have a demo day in the next couple of months, so I suggest you go try both options out. If you cant make the demo, you can rent a Hobie for $40 a day anytime you want. Personally, I would feel it the next day after a 3 or 4 or so mile paddle. On my outback, I went more than 9 miles last weekend and was no worse for the wear. But, is all up to personal preference and budget in the end. You'll likely be happy either way.
 

MJ21

Well-Known Member
#6
Excellent write up @DrErk. Put many things in perspective. I want the Hobie Pro Angler, but being that I am heading to Wyoming for the next 2 yrs before I retire, I will wait on purchasing one.

@JC08, costs money but IMO, definitely worth the investment. Good luck to ya!
 
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DrErk

Well-Known Member
#7
I considered the pro angler, but the outback is a much more versatile boat, so I went with that one. Plus, I have a tendency to bring to much with me each trip and the pro angler would just feed that tendency lol.
 

JC08

New Member
#8
I considered the pro angler, but the outback is a much more versatile boat, so I went with that one. Plus, I have a tendency to bring to much with me each trip and the pro angler would just feed that tendency lol.
What do you mean by more versatile? I u durst and the meaning of the word ha, just curious as to specifically for those two yaks
 

DrErk

Well-Known Member
#10
What do you mean by more versatile? I u durst and the meaning of the word ha, just curious as to specifically for those two yaks
The pro angler weighs 50 pounds more than the outback. If you're ever in shallow enough water that you have to paddle, the outback paddles like a regular kayak while the pro angler paddles like a raft. If you have to drag over very shallow water or through sand, the outback is under 100 lbs with a narrow keel while the pro angler is 150 lbs with a flatter keel. I've also heard the outback is much easier to get past the breakers if you ever go offshore.

I am 6' 1" and 230 lbs and can stand in the outback;would be more stable in the pro angler, but that's about the only benefit I could come up with for the pro angler over the outback.

I did quite a bit of research before I came to this decision lol.
 

JC08

New Member
#11
The pro angler weighs 50 pounds more than the outback. If you're ever in shallow enough water that you have to paddle, the outback paddles like a regular kayak while the pro angler paddles like a raft. If you have to drag over very shallow water or through sand, the outback is under 100 lbs with a narrow keel while the pro angler is 150 lbs with a flatter keel. I've also heard the outback is much easier to get past the breakers if you ever go offshore.

I am 6' 1" and 230 lbs and can stand in the outback;would be more stable in the pro angler, but that's about the only benefit I could come up with for the pro angler over the outback.

I did quite a bit of research before I came to this decision lol.
Thanks bud, all the info is appreciated
 

TuN3R

Administrator
Staff member
#12
Man last few months for some reason i have this feeling wanting to get me kayak lol. Some good discussions and great information guys keep it coming . Who knows next year i might jump the ship .
 
#13
Can your legs handle the peddle drive? Is another question also diffrent muscles. I have a buddy that has a hobie but his legs hurt more using it than hin using his coosa.
 

DrErk

Well-Known Member
#14
Can your legs handle the peddle drive? Is another question also diffrent muscles. I have a buddy that has a hobie but his legs hurt more using it than hin using his coosa.
That's the first I've ever heard of something like that... is he too tall to fully extend his leg against the drive or something?